inscapes
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The term inscape conveys some notion of representing the artist's psyche
as a kind of interior landscape. According to Professor Claude Cernuschi,
Roberto Matta's use of the term inscape for a series of landscape-like abstract
or surrealist paintings reflects "the psychoanalytic view of the mind as a
three-dimensional space: the 'inscape'. The term inscape was later taken up
by the leading Australian surrealist James Gleeson. American abstract artists
such as James Brooks, Jane Frank, and Mary Frank and even a group of
British fantasy artists founded by Brigid Marlin in 1961 and calling themselves
the 'Inscape Group'.


The word "inscape" is sometimes used, perhaps with a bit of poetic license,
to refer to the domain of interior design, suggesting that the interior of a house
or building is a kind of interior landscape, a counterpart to the landscape
surrounding the structure. It could be, however, that this use of the term is
intended as a double-entendre, evoking those other meanings of "inscape".

Gerard Manley Hopkins, the British Victorian poet and Jesuit priest, derived the
concept of inscape from the mediaeval philosopher, Duns Scotus. The term itself
means the unique, distinctive and inherent quality of a thing. Hopkins believed
that everything in the world was characterized by inscape and in turn inscape
was what designed an individual's dynamic, never static, identity. Because humans
are the most highly selved in the world, we can recognize the inscape in other
beings of the world through a process called instress, says Hopkins; and to
recognize a being's inscape through instress requires a divine intervention.
Inscape and instress play a major part in organizing the structure of Hopkins' poetry.


Wikipedia


More than the artworks of a museum, I enjoy the museum experience. Not only the learning experience, but the autocontemplation experience. It seems like every part of my being is confronted, questioned and moved. I can feel the weight of humanity, history, politics, sex, symbols, ideals and desires on my shoulders. I find myself reflecting on existentialist issues as well as on the simplest everyday thing.

Inside the walls of a museum, every part of my existence becomes an artwork subject to be contemplated. My works are an attempt to highlight the triggers of this phenomenon of self reflection which also occurs in sacred places of different religions. Churches of every religion also appeal and represent this personal temple where there is positive and negative, structures of thought. By creating empty spaces, these places represent a presence and sometimes this irrepresentable becomes, in fact, the awareness of the Self.

The erosion of the feeling of belonging to a “succession of generations rooted in the past and prolonged to the future” is the one that characterizes and generates contemporary narcissist painting worried mainly about the Self. Narcissism is the answer to the unconscious challenge of finding one’s self. The Self is se precipitated to an endless labour of liberation, observation and interpretation.

Plinio Avila 

"Representation has been emptied from its classic content because reality is
outside the circuit due to the use of photographical representative models.
‘Abandonment of the real to a hyperrealist circularity, in the exaggeration
of the making, the representation instituted historically as a humanist space,
is metamorphosed in situ in a cold machinal dispositive, losing any human scale
by the amplifications and accentuations of forms and color: not transgressed or overcome,
the order of representation is somehow abandoned by the perfection of execution."

Gilles Lipovetsky


Then why painting and not photography?

With the lack of theory for contemporary painting, realistic painting is installed nowadays as a kind of obsolete obsession unless it is approached from the inner perspective of the spectator and made to be experienced. I paint because there is still a little left in our imaginary as ‘educated’ spectators (/viewers) of art, of a metaphysical expectation before the painted surface. A desire many times unsatisfied by many paintings that, paradoxically, only painting can revive continuously.

Contemporary culture has educated us to a specific schemata of consumption of images, to a filter of appreciation even in the most advanced spheres of art followers. These images in photography will not make the spectator relate to them anymore than a visual frame related to a specific place and time. The contemplation takes place in the unfinished.

Mental images flourish from the empty painted image. There is not much to see in these paintings, but there are much more to see about yourself on them or through them. It makes more sense to present an image that more than ‘signifying’, it ‘reminds’.

The lack of last touch that separate these paintings from photographs is exactly what seems to make the spectator participate, by relating this awkward gap to that unfulfilled metaphysical desire. A desire that no image can satisfy. Only the reflection on it or by it.

Plinio Avila


 
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